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Is the Supreme People’s Court the Highest Form of “Government Window Dressing”?

June 23, 2017

Today we went to the entrance of the Supreme People’s Court. The bailiff was blocking the way of an elderly woman petitioner.  But when he saw us, he let us through, and called on his mobile to inform the authorities inside: “They have arrived and are going in.” Wenzu and I exchanged a knowing smile. 

We entered the Supreme People’s Court Hongsicun Reception Office [in the Hongsicun area of Beijing’s Chaoyang District, separate from the Court’s official location] and went to Window number 8. It was the same female judge as the first time, the one who evaluated Wenzu’s aesthetic appeal and refused to tell us her surname no matter what. When Wenzu took a photograph of me, the judge shouted: “Taking pictures is prohibited, there are regulations.” We replied: “Regulations are not above the law; we are exercising our citizens’ right of supervision.” The judge became exasperated, slammed my complaint onto the counter, and turned to her colleagues: “Everybody go inside, let them take pictures!” The judges all pitter-pattered into their back office.

After a while, they came out and wanted to see Li Wenzu’s complaint letter. I said: “I am waiting for you to apologize! You slammed down my complaint letter and identification card. You can’t just walk away when you can’t explain yourself!” The judge turned away again, to another window, and asked for Li Wenzu’s complaint letter. Wenzu handed it over. The judge glanced at it and immediately said: “This matter is Tianjin’s responsibility, we don’t handle it!” She finished speaking and left again! We called after her: “Don’t leave, you take our money as taxpayers, you are supposed to serve us, serve the people, don’t leave! Don’t forget General Secretary Xi’s guidance!”

The judge shot back angrily: “Taxpayers—I am also a taxpayer!”

As she was walking back inside, we heard her saying to her colleagues nonstop: “Wang Qiaoling . . . Li Wenzu . . . Wang Quanzhang’s father . . . . ” She refused to come to our window.

Such is the rhythm of events that is forcing us to head to the Dongjiaominxiang Office of the Supreme People’s Court [the official location of the Supreme People’s Court, separate from the reception office].

709 Family members Li Wenzu and Wang Qiaoling

The morning of June 23, 2017                      

Supreme People’s Court, Hongsicun Reception Office

 

 

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