Skip to content Skip to navigation

Stop Crackdowns in Tibet, Start Dialogue

March 14, 2008


Human Rights in China expresses its deep concern about the increasingly tense situation in Tibet following protests since Monday. Despite ongoing crackdowns in Tibet, demonstrations continue to grow with the recent protests, reported as the largest since 1989. "It appears that Tibetans may be nearing the end of their patience," said Sharon Hom, Executive Director of Human Rights in China. "The central government in China needs to recognize the failure of its current policy in Tibet and address the fundamental problems fueling the unrest: inequitable development, exclusion from meaningful political participation, and lack of protection for the integrity of Tibetan culture and religion. Instead of resorting to violence, the Chinese government needs to pursue a peaceful resolution through dialogue."

Instead of resorting to violence, the Chinese government needs to pursue a peaceful resolution through dialogue.
— Sharon Hom, Executive Director of HRIC

According to reports, protests by hundreds of monks, nuns, students, and lay people have occurred in Lhasa and its suburbs since March 10, the 49th anniversary of Tibetan Uprising Day. Three major monasteries have been surrounded by the military and locked down. Numerous Tibetans have been taken into custody, a curfew has been instated in Lhasa, and reports have emerged over the past two days of clashes between civilian demonstrators and police. Protests have also occurred in the autonomous areas in Qinghai, Gansu, and Sichuan provinces. There are reports as well of unprecedented interference by Chinese embassy officials this week in Tibet-related protest in other countries, including India, Nepal, and Greece.


For additional information, see: