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As the crackdown on lawyers and defenders that began in July 2015 continues with prolonged incommunicado detention of individuals without trial, family members of those still detained, and of those released after suffering abuses in custody, have not stopped speaking out to demand justice. In these narratives, what we are witnessing is a rising activism among a group determined to hold the authorities accountable for unlawfully suppressing citizens who are exercising rights protected by Chinese and international law. (All text translated by Human Rights in China.)

On the night of June 3-4, 1989, the authorities carried out a violent military crackdown on democracy protestors and independent union activists who had been gathering since April and attracting growing popular support. While international reporting focused on Tiananmen Square and Beijing, the crackdown was implemented nationally and resulted in a still unconfirmed number of deaths and detentions across China.

In June 1989, the Chinese authorities ended a peaceful protest movement by ordering a military crackdown that killed an untold number of unarmed civilians.

Over the past quarter century since the June Fourth crackdown, HRIC has provided advocacy support and solidarity to individuals and groups—particularly the Tiananmen Mothers, a group of family members of June Fourth victims and survivors—who have worked to hold the Chinese authorities accountable for their violence against unarmed and peaceful civilians.

June Fourth refers to the June 3-4, 1989 government military crackdown that ended the large-scale, peaceful protests in Beijing and other cities that spring and early summer. Despite persistent citizen demands for the truth and an accounting of the bloodshed, the authorities have offered nothing beyond their characterization that the protests were “counterrevolutionary riots”—a  label they later changed to “political disturbance” (政治风波)—which “the Party and state suppressed by using decisive measures.” (党和国家采取果断措施平息).

Tang Jingling (唐荆陵) was formally arrested on June 20, 2014, on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power” (煽动颠覆国家政权罪) and is currently being held at Guangzhou No. 1 Detention Center (广州市第一看守所). He was first criminally detained on May 16, 2014 on suspicion of “picking quarrels and provoking...
Wang Qingying (王清营) was formally arrested on June 20, 2014 on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power” (煽动颠覆国家政权罪) and is currently being held at Guangzhou No. 1 Detention Center (广州市第一看守所). He was first criminally detained on May 16, 2014 on suspicion of “picking quarrels and provoking...
Since the end of April, members of the Independent Chinese PEN Center—honorary council member Mrs. Gao Yu, council member Mrs. Liu Di, member Hu Shigen, and others—successively “lost contact” with the outside world. The homes of human rights lawyer Pu Zhiqiang, Beijing Film Academy professor Hao...
Yang Minghu , male, born February 1, 1947, killed at age 42; before his death, he was a staff member of the legal department of the patent section of the China Trade Promotion Commission; before dawn, at about 2:00am on June 4, 1989, he received a gunshot wound at Nanchizi that split his bladder...
In 1983, I spent five weeks traveling around China with my family on our first visit to the country. In those days, less than a decade after the death of Mao Zedong and the end of the Cultural Revolution, people were still wary of speaking to foreigners. Although my young daughter and I attracted...

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