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Detentions on Mainland Related to Occupy Central Movement, 2014

Compiled by HRIC based on published reports and information available online. Total Count=81 individuals.  (An asterisk (*) denotes that the detention or physical restriction of the individual has ended.) 

Last updated January 26, 2015. 

Dec 3

ArrestedSu Changlan (苏昌兰), Guangdong rights defender, on charge of “inciting subversion of state power.” According to reports, her arrest is related to online comments she made in support of Hong Kong. She is being held at Nanhai Detention Center. She was originally taken away by police on October 27. 

Nov 20

Arrested—Yu Wensheng (余文生), lawyer from Beijing Daoheng Law Office, on charge of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble,” after being taken by police on October 13. On October 11, the authorities barred him from meeting with his client Zhang Zonggang at the Taifeng Detention Center, who is being detained for supporting Hong Kong’s Occupy Movement. After persisting in his request to meet with his client, Yu was forcibly removed by police in the middle of the night. On October 12, Yu’s law firm was searched. On October 13, Yu was taken to Jinxin police substation where he was criminally detained on October 14, and arrested on November 20. The Beijing police have yet to notify Yu’s family of his detention or arrest, and have continued to unlawfully refuse his request to meet with a lawyer.

Nov 16

Criminally detainedSun Feng (孙峰), activist from Zibo, Shandong, on charge of “inciting subversion of state power,” reportedly for his support for the Occupy Movement. He is being held at Zibo Detention Center. 

Nov 15

Criminally detainedZhang Weishan (张玮珊), Changsha petitioner, for holding placards supportive of protests in Hong Kong.  She was taken away by police from the vicinity of Tiananmen Square in Beijing.  

Nov 11

Arrested—Wang Mo (王默), Jiangsu activist, on charge of “inciting subversion of state power,” for holding placards during protests in Guangzhou to support the Occupy Movement. He was first detained on charges of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble” on October 3 and detained at Guangzhou No. 1 Detention Center. 

Nov 9

Arrested—Han Ying (韩颖), Beijing rights defender. Taken from home by Fengtai District police for “picking quarrels and provoking troubles,” allegedly for taking photographs to support HK and posting messages of solidarity on Weibo. Detained at Beijing Fengtai District Detention Center. Originally summonsed on October 1. His family was notified of his formal arrest on November 9. 

Chinese Human Rights Defenders reports that the following people were also detained: Liu Xizhen (刘喜珍), female, and Pei Fugui (裴富贵), both detained at Beijing Fengtai District Detention Center; and Jiang Jiawen (姜家文), detained at Beijing Daxing Detention Center. On November 7, Liu Xizhen’s arrest was approved.

Nov 6

Arrested –Liu Huizhen (刘惠珍), housing rights activist, on charge of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble,” after gathering with 20 other activists at a restaurant on September 29 and raising placards supportive of Hong Kong. She was first taken away on October 1 and is being detained at Beijing Fengtai District Detention Center. .

Arrested –Xu Chongyang (徐崇阳), Wuhan activist, on charge of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble,” after gathering with 20 other activists at a restaurant on September 29 and raising placards supportive of Hong Kong. She was first taken away on October 2 and is being detained at Beijing Fengtai District Detention Center. .

Arrested –Li Yufeng (李玉凤), activist from Hunan Province, on charge of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble,” after gathering with 20 other activists at a restaurant on September 29 and raising placards supportive of Hong Kong. She was first taken away on September 30 and is being detained at Daxing Detention Center.

Nov 5

Arrested—couple Jiang Liuyong and Lidong (姜流勇、李冬梅夫妇), Beijing rights defenders, on charges of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble.” The couple was first taken away on September 30. 

Oct 29

Detained--Zhao Guoli (赵国莉), Shenzhen activist. Taken in the afternoon by officers from the Nanhu neighborhood government office of Luohu District in Shenzhen. Zhao’s mother was informed of her daughter’s detention by a staff member from the Shenzhen Provincial Bureau of Letters and Calls, but did not receive any official documents.

Oct 24

Banned From Travel —Liu Shasha (刘沙沙), Hunan activist, wife of Hong Kong citizen. She was en route to visit relatives in Hong Kong but was refused entry by Shenzhen boarder agents, who did not show her any official documents. Liu subsequently staged a hunger strike at the airport, and shouted “Down with the Communist Party.”

Oct 23

Criminally detained—Sun Tao (孙涛), Fujian activist and member of the Southern Street Movement, on charge of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble.” He was taken from the Ningde Jiuxian Temple, Fujian Province, by six officers from the Guangzhou State Security Team at 6:00 p.m. Earlier, in the morning of October 3, he wore a black T-shirt and held a banner saying “Freedom is invaluable! Support Hong Kong’s Fight for Freedom—the Southern Street Movement” with other SSM activists, Xiewen Fei (谢文飞), Sun Liyong (孙立勇), Wang Fulei (王福磊) and Wang Mo (王默), whom were taken later that evening.

Oct 20

Criminally detained—Chen Maosens (陈茂森), Jiangxi activist, on charge of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble.” Chen was taken from his Beijing residence by the State Security Team of the Jiangxi Fengxin Public Security Bureau and sent back to his hometown in Jiangxi. According to reports, his detention is related to his long-time focus on and support for protecting human rights, along with his advocacy for artists and activists who have been detained for their involvement in the Occupy Central Movement.

Oct 19

Criminally detained-Wang Jinling (王金玲), disabled petitioner from Heilongjiang, on charge of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble.” She was taken by police from the Zhaoyang District of Beijing after holding a placard with the slogan “Hong Kong, We Are With You” near CCTV’s headquarters on October 9, 2014. She is being held at the Beijing Zhaoyang Detention Center.  

Oct 14

Criminally detained—Ye Liumei (叶六妹), Liang zhuosen (梁灼森), Guo Huizhen (郭惠), Guangzhou activists, by police at 8:00 a.m., while en route to the neighborhood government offices to report land requisition issues. They were taken to the Tongji, Chancheng Sub-Bureau of the Foshan Public Security Bureau, apparently for their earlier attempts to go to Hong Kong to show solidarity with the Occupy Central participants. Police searched their homes.

Administratively detained-Chen Qitang (陈启棠), also known as Tian Li, Guangdong activist. He was taken away and his home was searched by police at 4:00 p.m. He was sentenced to ten days’ administrative detention. According to sources, police accused him of spreading rumors on the Internet. He is being held in Xiantang, Deshun District in Foshan.

Criminally Detained—Yu Wensheng (余文生), lawyer from Beijing Daoheng Law Office, on charge of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble,” after being taken by police on October 13.  On October 11, he tried to meet with client Zhang Zonggang at the Taifeng Detention Center, but was refused by the authorities. After his repeated attempts to negotiate failed, Yu said he would not leave the detention center until he saw Zhang. Zhang himself is being detained for supporting the Occupy Central Movement.

Oct 12

Criminally Detained—Liu Donghui (刘东辉), activist from Yueyang District in Hunan, on charge of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble.” According to reports, he was detained by police from the Yueyang Yunxi sub-district Public Security Bureau two days after returning from Hong Kong, where he participated in the Occupy Central Movement. His family received notification of his detention on October 13. He is being held in Yueyang Yunxi District Detention Center.

Oct 11

Books and other publications banned, censored, restricted—following a decision by China’s State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film, and Television that targets many mainland authors Additionally, books on religions such as Tibetan Buddhism, Christianity, and Islamism are ordered to be published with “restrictions,” books on oral history with “caution,” and books on Tibetan Lamas with “strict control.”

Below are some of the authors whose works have been restricted or banned:

Yu Yingshi (余英时), renowned scholar currently residing in the United States. The ban on his books might be directly caused by his support for the Hong Kong “Occupy Central” protests. He once remarked, “Hong Kong should fight. Even if it knows it’s going to fail, Hong Kong should carry on fighting.” The 10-volume Collected Works of Yu Yingshi (Yu Yingshi Wenxuan) is published by the Guangxi Normal University Press.

Jiubaodao (九把刀), born Giddens Ko, is a Taiwanese online writer and director. An active participant in social movements, Ko questioned the Cross-Strait Service Trade Agreement, and staunchly supported the “Sunflower Movement” that occupied the Legislative Yuan in March 2014.

Yefu (野夫), writer from Hubei, born Zheng Shiping, also known as Tujia Yefu. A former police officer, he was arrested and sentenced for showing sympathy to students and helping them flee after the 1989 Democracy Movement. He was released with a commuted sentence in 1995. Many of Yefu’s works, such as “Under the River” and “Where’s the way home?,” are banned in mainland China.

Mao Yushi (茅于轼), renowned liberal economist. His views are frequently attacked online by Maoists.

Zhang Qianfan (张千帆), professor at Peking University Law School and an advocate for education equality and constitutional democracy. He was recently ordered by the State Internet Information Office to delete his blog and weibo posts.

Leung Man-tao (梁文道), Hong Kong intellectual and media professional. He is well known to mainland viewers as the host of a book review program on Phoenix Television. While he is relatively cautious with his public remarks, the book ban might be related to his commentary “Why are they afraid of Occupy Central?

Xu Zhiyuan (许知远), senior media professional from mainland China. He was chief editor at the Economic Observer, and has recently been writing long interview pieces on June 4 activists such as Wang Dan (王丹) and Wan Runnan (万润南).

Oct 9

Criminally detained—Guo Yushan (郭玉闪), by Beijing Police at 2:00 p.m., on charge of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble.” He is being held at the Beijing No. 1 Detention Center. Some sources allege he was detained for printing pro-Occupy Central promotional materials with a former employee of the Transition Institute.

Criminally detained—Kou Yanding (寇延丁), freelance writer, independent documentary film producer, and NGO worker, by the Beijing police on charge of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble.” According to sources, she was taken away and detained while en route to Wutai mountain. The specific reason for her detention is unknown.

Taken away—Kuang Laowu (邝老五), Zhang haiying (张海鹰), Chen Kun (陈堃), Xue Ye (薛野), Huang Kaiping (黄凯平), related to their supportive statements about Hong Kong. 

Oct 8

Taken away—Dui Hun (追魂) artist, and Lu Shang (吕上) , according to reports, for discussing matters relating to the rescue of arrested persons in a weixin group. Detained at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center. Also detained with them is poet Li Lei (李磊).

Oct 7

Taken away—Ding Weibing (丁伟兵), Beijing Songzhuang artist, at 1:00 am and being held at Beijing No.1 Detention Center. Chinese Human Rights Defenders reports that at 12:15am, individuals claiming to be from the detention center phoned Ding’s wife and asked her to open the door. More than ten individuals entered the house looking for ID cards and phones, and rummaged through things. At Dings’ request, the individuals presented their police IDs and search warrant. Six or seven police took Ding aside to take notes. The family’s computer and memory cards were confiscated.

Oct 3

Taken away—Wang Su’e (王素娥), female, and held in Beijing Daxing Detention Center.

Taken away—Xiewen Fei (谢文飞)Wang Mo (王默)Sun Liyong (孙立勇), and Wang Fulei (王福磊), for holding placards supportive of Hong Kong protests in Guangzhou. Held at Guangzhou Yuexiu District Detention Center.

Taken away—Zhang Shengyu (张圣雨), Guangdong activists. He was pulled into a car by plainclothes police when passing by Dasha Street in Guangzhou.

Oct 2

Criminally detained—Wang Zang (王藏), poet and Independent Chinese PEN member, by Tongzhou police on charge of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble.” Police also raided his home. Wang had posted a photo of himself online with a shaved head, holding an umbrella, and sticking up his middle finger. He is being held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center. On October 8, Wang’s wife and less than two-year-old daughter were detained at Songzhuang Detention Center from noon to midnight.

Arrested—Cui Guangxia (崔广厦), Beijing Songzhuang artist. Organized a “Support Hong Kong’s Umbrella Revolution” music concert but the event was shut down by police before it could start. Cui was arrested on the spot along with Zhang Miao, the Epoch Times’ Beijing correspondent. They are being held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center.

Taken away—Zhu Yanguang (朱雁光), Beijing Songzhuang artist, by police in connection with his creative work "memorial."  Held in Beijing No. 1 Detention Center.

Criminally detainedGuo Hongwei (郭洪伟), Jilin activist. Detained after bumping into petitioners holding placards supportive of HK protests, but he himself did not raise one. He and his mother were taken to Daxing District Jixing Detention Center at 1:00am; his mother was released later that day. Guo was previously detained on July 7 this year, and was formally arrested 35 days later on charges of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble.” He was released on bail on September 9.

Taken away—Wang Fang (王芳), Wuhan rights activist,along with Ran Suibi, by police after posting photos of herself raising placards supporting Occupy Central at the Beijing south station.

Taken away—Ran Suibi (冉祟碧), Guangdong petitioner, along with Wang Fan, after raising placards supporting Occupy Central at the Beijing south station.

*Criminally Detained –Ling Lisha (丽莎), arts editor, on charge of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble,” after posting a sign supportive of Hong Kong on Peking University campus with Zhang Qibin. Detained at Haidian District Detention Center. Released on bail on December 11, after 70 days in detention. According to Chinese law, after 37 days in detention, a detainee must be formally arrested or released.

Criminally Detained –Zhang Qibin (), foundation employee, on charge of “picking quarrels and provoking trouble,” after posting a sign supportive of Hong Kong on Peking University campus with Ling Lisha. Detained at Haidian District Detention Center.

Chinese Human Rights Defenders reports that the following people were also detained: Wang Chongxi (王崇喜) and Xu Chongyang (徐崇阳), held at Beijing Fengtai Detention Center; Zhang Miao (张淼 ), female, Fei Xiaosheng (费晓胜), and Wang Lin (王琳), female, held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center; and Ren Zhongyuan (任重远), held at Beijing Tongzhou Detention Center.

Sept 30

Taken away—Chen Maosen (陈茂森), Songning Sheng (宋宁生), and Gong Xinhua (龚新华), Jiangxi activists. Taken by 60-70 police from Ningdu County, Jiangxi, after raising placards to search for two missing petitioners, show support for Occupy Central, and call for Chinese to “struggle for freedom.” Police also searched Song Ningsheng’s home. 

Chinese Human Rights Defenders reports that the following five individuals were taken away on September 30, after gathering with other activists at a restaurant on September 29 and raising placards supportive of Hong Kong. They were released on November 1:

Chinese Human Rights Defenders reports that the following five individuals were taken away on September 30, after gathering with other activists at a restaurant on September 29 and raising placards supportive of Hong Kong. They were released on November 1:

Sent to a “legal education” center in Hebei upon release:

  • Chen Lianhe (陈连和), housing rights activist
  • Cui Baoti (崔宝弟) ,female, housing rights activist
  • Wu Xiaoping (吴小平), housing rights activist

Returned home:

  • Han Shuqing (韩淑清), housing rights activist
  • Guo Zhiying (郭志英) ,female, housing rights activist

Sept 28

Taken away—Wang Long (汪龙), in Guangdong after expressing solidarity with Hong Kong on weibo.

 

Chinese Human Rights Defenders reports that the following people have also been detained, but the exact time when they were detained is unknown: Xie Dan (谢丹), Chongqing; Luo Yaling (罗亚玲), female, sentenced to 10 days of administrative detention for showing solidarity with Hong Kong; Hou Minling (侯敏玲), Gansu, female, held at Beijing Daxing Detention Center; Zheng Luying (郑禄英), female; Ling Lisha (凌丽莎), female; Liu Hui (刘辉); and Huang Minpeng (黄敏鹏)

 

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