Skip to content Skip to navigation

Hong Kong

[English Translation by HRIC] Dear Kitty Ho of September 28, If I told you how I’ve spent this past month and what I’ve heard, you would tell me I am a liar. . . . Ever since you were little, you’ve been scared of crowds and death. That was why you didn’t try to get into Admiralty in Central, but...

Updated: December 8, 2014

Essays and Other Expressions

Human Rights in China invites the people of Hong Kong who have experienced—participated in or observed—the Umbrella Movement to send us short personal essays, poetry, journal entries, short video messages, or photographs.

The submissions will be posted in a special “Hong Kong: Voices of the People” section of our website.

Today in Geneva, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women posed hard-hitting questions on the progress of women’s rights in mainland China, Hong Kong, and Macao. In a comprehensive exchange with the Chinese delegation, the independent experts on the Committee raised a...

Since 1996, HRIC has maintained a programme presence in Hong Kong, facilitating our work on mainland human rights issues. HRIC also has a small Hong Kong office, and we actively engage in outreach to diverse groups, including the diplomatic, NGO, and academic communities. As the central Chinese government tightens its control over Hong Kong affairs, we have expanded our programme work to specifically address heightened threats to rule of law, democracy, and human rights. We are expanding  of our capacity-building work aimed at diverse stakeholders.

Compiled by HRIC based on published reports and information available online. Total Count=81 individuals.  (An asterisk (*) denotes that the detention or physical restriction of the individual has ended.) 

Last updated January 26, 2015. 

In 1989, millions of democracy and labor activists and other citizens throughout China demanded reforms. The leaders responded with tanks and violence and then attempted to silence demands for political reform with the benefits of economic liberalization. What the Chinese people got are...

 

Lawyers' March for Judicial Independence, June 27, 2014

A statement in the white paper requiring judges to be patriotic also prompted a strong reaction from Hong Kong’s legal community. On June 27, 2014, more than 1,000 Hong Kong lawyers—as many as 1,800 by some estimates—marched to protest what they saw as Beijing’s interference in Hong Kong’s judicial independence.

[Translation by Human Rights in China] In the 1970s, an article in Undergrad —a periodical published by the Student Council of the University of Hong Kong (HKU)—resonated with many people with its description of Hong Kong as a “free yet undemocratic” city. Although people argued over whether Hong...

Pages

Subscribe to Hong Kong
Error | Human Rights in China 中国人权 | HRIC

Error

The website encountered an unexpected error. Please try again later.