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June Fourth Overview

June Fourth refers to the June 3-4, 1989 government military crackdown that ended the large-scale, peaceful protests in Beijing and other cities that spring and early summer. Despite persistent citizen demands for the truth and an accounting of the bloodshed, the authorities have offered nothing beyond their characterization that the protests were “counterrevolutionary riots”—a  label they later changed to “political disturbance” (政治风波)—which “the Party and state suppressed by using decisive measures.” (党和国家采取果断措施平息). More >

Photos: May-June 1989, Beijing
Photos from HRIC archive and courtesy of Gail Butler, Libby Schmalz.
HRIC Resources

30th Anniversary of June Fourth

June Fourth at 25

Background

Victims and Survivors

Oral Histories, Essays, Reflections

View from the Other Side

Multimedia

China Rights Forum Special June Fourth Issues

All HRIC June Fourth Related Items

Other Resources
What You Can Do

Showing solidarity to the Tiananmen Mothers and other human rights defenders and advocates in China is essential, especially during this period of social control. In the increasingly restrictive domestic environment in China, direct contact with foreigners, receipt of funds from international sources, and other common methods of support are risky and difficult. However, public messages of support are effective.

  • Write a public message to the Tiananmen Mothers using the form provided on this page.
    • We will share the messages with the mothers in safe and secure ways
  • Text or email the link to The Unforgotten to your family, friends, and coworkers.
  • Use social media to show your support:
    • Write your own post on social media about The Unforgotten.
    • Share HRIC’s social media posts: Twitter and Facebook.
    • Comment showing your support on HRIC’s social media.
    • Don’t forget hashtags: #unforgotten #remember64 #June4 #Tiananmen64 #拒绝遗忘 #纪念六四 #六四 #天安门六四
  • Organize a screening to watch the 2009 documentary Portraits of Loss, available for free on HRIC’s website.